Bloat In Dogs: A True Pet Emergency

bloat in dogsAlthough few conditions can kill a dog as quickly as bloat, many pet owners remain unaware of its dangers, and don’t know how to recognize the signs and symptoms of bloat in dogs. Knowing the signs of bloat, as well as your emergency care options, is critical in protecting your dog from this serious, and often deadly, condition.

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Not What the Doctor Ordered: Human Medications and Your Pet

human medications and petsAs pet owners, it’s only natural for us to want our animals to feel better. We often do whatever we can to make that happen. Sometimes, it may be tempting to give your pet some of your medication, and while this may seem harmless, it is often not.

Over the counter medications are not always safe for our furry friends. Summeridge Animal Clinic wants you to think twice before combining human medications and your pet.

Why Human Medications and Your Pet Don’t Mix

It’s true that human medications for pets are sometimes prescribed. However, if you’re not well versed in animal physiology and pharmacology, this can be a dangerous practice. Pets are not people. They often require different dosages than what is on the label. Different species metabolize drugs differently, as well. For instance, both dogs and people often take a medication called levothyroxine for low thyroid hormone. The dose a 100 pound labrador retriever would take, however, could kill a 100 pound person.

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Snowed in: Indoor Considerations for Dogs in the Winter

We are no strangers to snowy winters here in Ontario, and neither are our dogs. While there is nothing wrong with letting your pooch out in the yard or taking a wintry walk together, sometimes it’s simply too cold or snowy (or both) to be outdoors safely.

If you find yourself snowed in with your dog this winter, never fear. Your friends at Summeridge Animal Clinic have put together a “survival guide” to caring for dogs in the winter, all while keeping your sanity in check!

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